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Some important insights we gathered from our interviews with tourists.  Most of them revolved around the fact that they were unfamiliar with the city and therefore, uncomfortable with using a local service that would largely require self-navigation and self-service.  

Some important insights we gathered from our interviews with tourists.  Most of them revolved around the fact that they were unfamiliar with the city and therefore, uncomfortable with using a local service that would largely require self-navigation and self-service.  

To address those concerns voiced by our interviewees, we created a new and improved version of the CitiBike app.   We intentionally proposed smaller, but feasible revisions to CitiBike's digital platforms, because hardware and system logistics are largely dependent on a variety of environmental, zoning, etc. factors outside our scope as designers and would be harder to implement.

To address those concerns voiced by our interviewees, we created a new and improved version of the CitiBike app.   We intentionally proposed smaller, but feasible revisions to CitiBike's digital platforms, because hardware and system logistics are largely dependent on a variety of environmental, zoning, etc. factors outside our scope as designers and would be harder to implement.

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CITIBIKE APP 2.0

DESIGN IN PUBLIC SPACES

As a bike sharing program in New York City, Citi Bike came to SVA IxD for ideas on how to expand their user base beyond just everyday commuters who buy annual passes. The challenge we were tasked with addressing was: how can Citi Bike raise awareness of their program among tourists from the US and abroad and sell more 24-hour and 7-day passes?   

After interviewing tourists and trying out the service ourselves as first-time users, my teammates, Sam Carmichael, Sunnie Sang, Matthew Brigante, and I came up with the following solutions, told through the story of a tourist from Scotland, Laura.

Skills: user research, user journey, interface design